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The IceCube Neutrino Observatory reports a surprising discovery in Nature

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The intense conditions needed to generate cosmic rays have focused physicists’ interest on two potential sources: the massive black holes at the centers of active galaxies, and the exploding fireballs observed by astronomers as gamma ray bursts.
The IceCube Neutrino Observatory reports a surprising discovery in Nature

Image: http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/news/current

Doug Cowen, Tyce de Young and Peter Meszaros are part of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory that is using neutrinos, believed to accompany cosmic ray production, to explore these theories. In a paper published April 19 in the journal Nature, the IceCube collaboration describes a search for neutrinos emitted from 300 gamma ray bursts observed, most recently in coincidence with the SWIFT and Fermi satellites, between May 2008 and April 2010. Surprisingly, they found none - a result that contradicts 15 years of predictions and challenges one of the two leading theories for the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays.

The paper can be read online here.